Ramen Snack Mix

Turn a Pack of Ramen Noodles into a Healthy Snack

From Everyday Food

This crunchy Ramen Noodle snack mix makes for a delicious and healthy way for adults to enjoy Ramen noodles. Plus, it’s incredibly easy, with only three steps. 

Crunchy Ramen Snack Mix Recipe 



Ingredients 


2 packages ramen, broken into small pieces (seasoning packet discarded)

1 cup raw cashews

1 cup raw peanuts

1 cup cornflakes

3 tablespoons vegetable oil

4 teaspoons curry powder

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1/2 teaspoon fine salt

1/2 cup fried or freeze-dried peas

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. On a rimmed baking sheet, toss ramen, cashews, peanuts, and cornflakes with oil until coated.

2. Spread mixture in an even layer. Combine curry powder, cayenne, and salt; sprinkle over ramen mixture.

3. Bake until golden brown, about 10 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir in peas and let cool completely before serving.

Teenager Phone Contract

18 Point “Teenager” Phone Contract

1. It is my phone. I bought it. I pay for it. I am loaning it to you. Aren’t I the greatest?
2. I will always know the password.
3. If it rings, answer it. It is a phone. Say hello, use your manners. Do not ever ignore a phone call if the screen reads “Mom” or “Dad”. Not ever.
4. Hand the phone to one of your parents promptly at 7:30pm every school night & every weekend night at 9:00pm. It will be shut off for the night and turned on again at 7:30am. If you would not make a call to someone’s land line, wherein their parents may answer first, then do not call or text. Listen to those instincts and respect other families like we would like to be respected.
5. It does not go to school with you. Have a conversation with the people you text in person. It’s a life skill.
6. If it falls into the toilet, smashes on the ground, or vanishes into thin air, you are responsible for the replacement costs or repairs.
7. Do not use this technology to lie, fool, or deceive another human being. Do not involve yourself in conversations that are hurtful to others. Be a good friend first or stay the hell out of the crossfire.
8-9. Do not text, email, or say anything through this device you would not say in person.
10. No porn.
11. Turn it off, silence it, put it away in public. Especially in a restaurant, at the movies, or while speaking with another human being. You are not a rude person; do not allow the iPhone to change that.
12. Do not send or receive pictures of your private parts or anyone else’s private parts. Don’t laugh. Someday you will be tempted to do this despite your high intelligence. It is risky and could ruin your teenage/college/adult life. It is always a bad idea. Cyberspace is vast and more powerful than you. And it is hard to make anything of this magnitude disappear — including a bad reputation.
13. Don’t take a zillion pictures and videos. There is no need to document everything. Live your experiences. They will be stored in your memory for eternity.
14. Leave your phone home sometimes and feel safe and secure in that decision. It is not alive or an extension of you. Learn to live without it. Be bigger and more powerful than FOMO — fear of missing out.
15. Download music that is new or classic or different than the millions of your peers that listen to the same exact stuff. Your generation has access to music like never before in history. Take advantage of that gift. Expand your horizons.
16. Play a game with words or puzzles or brain teasers every now and then.
17. Keep your eyes up. See the world happening around you. Stare out a window. Listen to the birds. Take a walk. Talk to a stranger. Wonder without googling.
18. You will mess up. I will take away your phone. We will sit down and talk about it. We will start over again. You & I, we are always learning. I am on your team. We are in this together.

Lying Child

When Our Children Lie

Dear Dr. Bill,

Ever since my second daughter could walk and talk, she has been sneaky and a little deceitful.  She’s now almost 6-years-old and is very smart and sweet, but her tendency to lie and misbehave without regard for consequences continues to baffle me.  Recently has begun lying right up to the point of absolute denial because she was afraid of facing discipline for disobedience.  What should I do?

–Krista

Dear Krista,

It’s likely that your daughter has found that lying works for her—at least some of the time.  She’s learned that telling a fib helps her to avoid or at least delay punishment.  So the first step you need to take is to make the consequences for lying much more severe than for other types of misbehavior.  In other words, if she deliberately breaks one of her sister’s toys, she will receive a consequence, but if she LIES about it, her punishment will be considerably more severe.

You’ll need to clearly explain this to her, so that she knows in advance that she’s much better off telling the truth and admitting to an infraction, even if she does experience a negative consequence for her misbehavior.

The key is to follow through, and to find consequences that are truly meaningful to her.  For example, let’s say her favorite activity these days is playing with Barbie dolls.  If she tells a lie, she loses Barbie for two days.

In addition to consistent, powerful consequences for lying, you should also begin praising her when she tells the truth.  We often forget how important it is to “catch our kids being good.”

My guess is that you’ve fallen into a negative cycle with your daughter, and the best way to break that cycle is to consciously work toward praising and rewarding her when she obeys and tells the truth, rather than simply punishing her when she disobeys or lies.

Thanks for writing Krista.  If you have a question for me about family issues or Christian living, just click the “Questions” tab on the Family Expert page.

 
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